The Coast Road Home

Three years ago, it was a beautiful March Saturday in New Glarus, Wisconsin. The sun was out. The day, a crisp cool prelude to spring. Divorced mom Marley Lennox wanted nothing more than to spend time with her two kids at the family farm, a peaceful setting outside of town. They’d all been looking forward to helping tend to the newborn calf and spending a quiet weekend in the countryside.

But then the shooter showed up, armed to the teeth and ready to kill. The massacre lasted less than ten minutes, but the damage had been done. Marley’s entire family had been wiped out, gone forever.

Shaken, and suffering from survivor’s guilt, Marley’s life is spiraling downward. After three years of trying to leave the past behind, she realizes she needs to get out of Wisconsin and start over, otherwise she’ll go mad. But where does she go? She decides she needs an adventure, a road trip to get her head on straight and give her time to think about her next step.

When a car accident lands her in Pelican Pointe, she’s forced to stay until she’s healed. But after meeting her doctor, Gideon Nighthawk, things start happening fast, feelings  surface that she never expected to feel again, feelings she thought were gone for good. But is she really ready to start her life over? Or will she forever live in the shadow of  guilt?  Will Gideon be enough to help her turn her life around? Or will she always feel trapped in a never-ending circle filled with grief and anger?

gardens are good, but weeding sucks

After spending most of my morning pulling weeds, there’s something to be said for container gardens. containersNo tugging up milkweed (very long roots and back-breaking stuff), no yanking up dandelions (a piece of cake compared to pulling up milkweed). According to Mother Earth Living you can grow anything from artichokes to zucchini in containers. I’m about ready to put it to the test just for the “no weeding” idea of it.  Maybe I’ll start collecting pots of all kinds like the lady down the street who can grow anything in old shoes. No joke. She has dozens of odd things she uses to grow daisies, beans, even tomatoes. Me? I guess I’ll figure out a way to turn my patio into a garden. To hell with weeds. Weeds suck.Patio garden

pretty container

 

pineapple sage

Looking for a sweet-smelling addition to your spring garden? Try pineapple sage. It blooms late summer into the fall. the long stalks produce gorgeous crimson flowers. Bees, hummingbirds, and butterflies love this perennial that also doubles as an annual in certain zones.

pineapple sage

Image credit: Michlers.com